Bi Gan – Long Day’s Journey Into Night

Watching Bi Gan’s Long Day’s Journey Into Night, there can be little doubt that the director himself is a cinephile. Here, we witness touches of Tarantino, Kar-wai, Ming-liang and the biggest of them all, Tarkovsky. Yet the fanaticism Gan displays isn’t one of inspired creative force but rather of a constraining shadow. I would err, … Continue reading Bi Gan – Long Day’s Journey Into Night

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Jim Jarmusch – The Dead Don’t Die

The Dead Don’t Die (2019) carries a wayward restlessness reminiscent of improvisational noise-rock. To trace this aesthetic lineage, recall Jarmusch’s debut Permanent Vacation (1980); Jarmusch captured downtown New York’s then No-Wave atmosphere, presenting the city as a bombed out and empty playground for poets. The connection becomes more established through Chloë Sevigny, who co-stars in … Continue reading Jim Jarmusch – The Dead Don’t Die

Michael Palmieri and Donald Mosher – The Gospel of Eureka

Video killed the radio-star, and I’d be quick to add, the death of storytelling’s oral tradition. But one can’t ignore the rise and popularity of audiobooks and podcasts. Michael Palmieri and Donald Mosher’s The Gospel of Eureka appropriately begins with the image of a black screen and an accompanying voice-over: “Everyone loves a good story … Continue reading Michael Palmieri and Donald Mosher – The Gospel of Eureka

Dan Gilroy – Velvet Buzzsaw

Velvet Buzzsaw seems to be from the bygone era of the literary Brat Pack’s heyday. The film’s world of selfish characters, sleek architecture, and high couture, despite its L.A. trappings, recall the east-coast set novels of Brett Easton Ellis—American Psycho, for example. Yet, an L.A. setting alongside a script meant to both terrify and satirize … Continue reading Dan Gilroy – Velvet Buzzsaw