The Twists and Turns of Timecrimes

A horror, comedy, and tragedy film in three acts, Nacho Vigalondo’s Timecrimes mixes the follies of Ancient Greek plays with the wonder (and dangers) of classic sci-fi pulp. After being attacked by an unknown assailant, Hector (Karra Elejalde) unknowingly flees into a time-machine. He’s flung back to the start of the day, but he’s not…

The Ghosts of Les Haute Solitudes

Shot in black and white, entirely silent, and comprised mostly of close-ups, Les Haute Solitudes (1974) becomes an exercise in studying gestures; Dreyer’s close-ups of Renee Falconetti as Jeanne d’Arc elongated to an hour length film if you will. But perhaps the best reference point for understanding Les Haute Solitudes retrospectively is time. Andre Bazin…

Film of the Week: Allemagne 90 Neuf Zero

Jean-Luc Godard has always incorporated the history of Western art and politics in his films, beginning with À bout de souffle (1960) where Humphrey Bogart and Charles De Gaulle both were re-purposed as critical tools of their respective hegemonies. Godard’s dual interests would continue to wax and eventually lead to a radical shift in his…

Film of the Week: Ali Fear Eats the Soul

In Ali Fear Eats the Soul, Rainer Fassbinder brings to the fore the social tensions of a post-WWII Germany, rendering it in the everyday lives of the film’s outcast couple, Emmi (Brigitte Mira) a 60-years old German widow and Ali (El Hedi ben Salem) a 40-years old Moroccan immigrant. Despite the language barrier, Emmi and…

Golden Eighties: Love in the Age of Material Desire

Chantal Akerman's films examine the limited spaces in which women must find their freedom in. Take for example Delphine Seyrig in Jeanne Dielman (1975) shifting constantly between the kitchen, bedroom, and dining room, or Akerman as the unknown girl in La Chambre (1972) constantly on the move in order to avoid the camera's gaze. In…

The Rider: Chloe Zhao creates a new Western hero

In American culture the cowboy lives as a mythic figure, thanks in large part to the cinema and John Wayne, a man of modern legend. In The Rider, Chloe Zhao uses these same cinematic tools to deconstruct not just the cowboy, but a certain masculine ideal of what it means to be a hero. After…

Film of the Week: The Freshman

Before Jean-Paul Belmondo’s iconic role as the Bogart-esque swaggering Michele, there was Harold Lloyd as Harold Lamb, another man who found cinema to be a world that corresponded with his desires. A bumbling fool and underdog , The Freshman centers on Lamb’s first year at Tate University and his attempts to become popular by modeling…